Results for - Best Books For Everyone On Your List, And You Too!

2,257 voters participated in this survey

With holiday gift giving just around the corner, and cold winter days ahead (at least for most of us), books provide the perfect answer to what to give, and how to get through those cold days ahead. Here are just a few of the best books published this year -- something sure to please almost everyone.

First off, here are a few of the best recommended non-fiction books published this year. Do any on this list sound like something you would like to read, or know someone who would enjoy receiving them?

1. First off, here are a few of the best recommended non-fiction books published this year. Do any on this list sound like something you would like to read, or know someone who would enjoy receiving them?

Hello World: Being Human in the Age of Algorithms by Hannah Fry -- ' One of the best books yet written on data and algorithms. . .deserves a place on the bestseller charts.' (The Times) You are accused of a crime. Who would you rather determined your fate - a human or an algorithm? Absolutely fascinating read.
8%
181 votes
The Spy and the Traitor by Ben Macintyre -- If anyone could be considered a Russian counterpart to the infamous British double-agent Kim Philby, it was Oleg Gordievsky. The son of two KGB agents and the product of the best Soviet institutions, the savvy, sophisticated Gordievsky grew to see his nation's communism as both criminal and philistine. He took his first posting for Russian intelligence in 1968 and eventually became the Soviet Union's top man in London, but from 1973 on he was secretly working for MI6. For nearly a decade, as the Cold War reached its twilight, Gordievsky helped the West turn the tables on the KGB, exposing Russian spies and helping to foil countless intelligence plots, as the Soviet leadership grew increasingly paranoid at the United States's nuclear first-strike capabilities and brought the world closer to the brink of war
15%
324 votes
Amateur: A True Story About What Makes a Man by Thomas Page McBee -- Shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction this groundbreaking new book, by McBee, a trans man, who trains to fight in a charity match at Madison Square Garden while struggling to untangle the vexed relationship between masculinity and violence.Through his experience of boxing - learning to get hit, and to hit back; wrestling with the camaraderie of the gym; confronting the betrayals and strength of his own body - McBee examines the weight of male violence, the pervasiveness of gender stereotypes and the limitations of conventional masculinity. A wide-ranging exploration of gender in our society,
7%
154 votes
Imperial Twilight: The Opium War and the End of China's Last Golden Age by Stephen Platt -- As China reclaims its position as a world power, Imperial Twilight looks back to tell the story of the country's last age of ascendance and how it came to an end in the nineteenth-century Opium War. ...
6%
139 votes
Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy by Serhii Plokhii -- On 26 April 1986 at 1.23am a reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Soviet Ukraine exploded. While the authorities scrambled to understand what was occurring, workers, engineers, firefighters and those living in the area were abandoned to their fate.
11%
231 votes
She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity by Carl Zimmer -- Shortlisted for the 2018 Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction, She Has Her Mother's Laugh presents a profoundly original perspective on what we pass along from generation to generation. Charles Darwin played a crucial part in turning heredity into a scientific question, and yet he failed spectacularly to answer it.
10%
230 votes
None of them
66%
1,452 votes
Now, for some non-fiction, a brief list of some of the best offerings this year, so far. Are there any on this list that would appeal to either you or someone you know?

2. Now, for some non-fiction, a brief list of some of the best offerings this year, so far. Are there any on this list that would appeal to either you or someone you know?

The Clockmaker's Daughter by Kate Morton -- From the New York Times bestselling author of The Forgotten Garden: In the summer of 1862, a group of young artists led by the passionate and talented Edward Radcliffe descends upon Birchwood Manor on the banks of the Upper Thames. Their plan: to spend a secluded summer month in a haze of inspiration and creativity. But by the time their stay is over, one woman has been shot dead while another has disappeared; a priceless heirloom is missing; and Edward Radcliffe's life is in ruins.
16%
341 votes
Putney by Sofka Zinovieff -- In the spirit of Zoë Heller's Notes on a Scandal and Tom Perrotta's Mrs. Fletcher, an explosive and thought-provoking novel about the far-reaching repercussions of an illicit relationship between a young girl and a man twenty years her senior.
8%
175 votes
A Spark of Light by Jodi Picoult -- The stunning and urgent new novel from the Number One bestselling author of Small Great Things. The Center for women's reproductive health offers a last chance at hope - but nobody ends up there by choice. Its very existence is controversial, and to the demonstrators who barricade the building every day, the service it offers is no different from legalised murder. Now life and death decisions are being made horrifyingly real: a lone protester with a gun has taken the staff, patients and visitors hostage.
11%
237 votes
The House of Broken Angels by Luís Alberto Urrea -- From a Pulitzer Prize finalist comes a powerful and unforgettable portrait of one Mexican American family and the American dream. Widely reviewed to be one of the most vivid and engrossing family epics of the last twenty years
10%
216 votes
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones -- Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. In this deft exploration of love, loyalty, race, justice, and both Black masculinity and Black womanhood in 21st century America, Jones achieves that most-illusive of all literary goals: the Great American Novel.
9%
190 votes
Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty -- Could ten days at a health resort really change you forever? In Liane Moriarty's latest page-turner, nine perfect strangers are about to find out... Nine people gather at a remote health resort. Some are here to lose weight, some are here to get a reboot on life, some are here for reasons they can't even admit to themselves. Amidst all of the luxury and pampering, the mindfulness and meditation, they know these ten days might involve some real work. But none of them could imagine just how challenging the next ten days are going to be.
14%
314 votes
None of them
66%
1,455 votes
Now, the next set are the thriller fiction, one of my favorite categories. Which ones sound good to you, or maybe for someone on your list?

3. Now, the next set are the thriller fiction, one of my favorite categories. Which ones sound good to you, or maybe for someone on your list?

Give Me Your Hand by Megan Abbott -- Arguably the most anticipated thriller of the year, Megan Abbott's latest novel hinges on a life-altering secret that threatens to end a life-long friendship (and possibly, a life). Abbott, the ever-impressive author, will leave you in suspense until the very end.
12%
265 votes
Baby Teeth by Zoje Stage -- Deemed "unnerving" and "unputdownable" by The New York Times, Zoje Stage's Baby Teeth about a mother locked in a battle of wills with her clever and manipulative 7-year-old daughter is a must-read thriller with an unpredictable ending that promises to shock readers.
14%
304 votes
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn -- This psychological thriller about an agoraphobic woman who witnesses a crime in a neighboring home is so good that it's earned a glowing endorsement from Gillian Flynn herself. (Yes, the author of the best-selling novel Gone Girl ). I read this in one sitting -- could not put it down
20%
444 votes
The Flight Attendant by Chris Bohjalian -- The premise of Bohjalian's latest novel is an undeniably intriguing one: When a flight attendant wakes up in a hotel room next to a dead man with no memory of what happened the night before, she starts to wonder if she was really capable of committing the crime—and if she didn't, then who did?
14%
313 votes
None of them
66%
1,445 votes
Finally, science fiction. I'm not a big fan, but I know I am in the minority on this one. Which ones sound good either for you or someone you know?

4. Finally, science fiction. I'm not a big fan, but I know I am in the minority on this one. Which ones sound good either for you or someone you know?

Red Moon by Kim Stanley Robinson -- The latest novel from legendary science fiction author Robinson, blends realism and drama in a way that instantly transports the reader to the lunar surface. The book, which takes place 30 years into the future, opens on the journeys of Fred Fredericks, an American quantum engineer working for a Swiss company, and Ta Shu, a poet, feng shui expert and celebrity travel reporter to the moon where they are traveling to work. In the world of the book, China has become the first political and technological entity to inhabit the moon in a serious, long-term way.
10%
216 votes
Before Mars by Emma Newman -- Emma Newman's latest book set in her "Planetfall" universe, "Before Mars," sees a geologist arriving at a small Mars base after a lengthy journey only to realize that things aren't as they seem. The base's AI is untrustworthy, the psychologist seems sinister, and the main characters finds a note to herself she has no memory of writing. In a world of perfectly immersive virtual reality, can she trust what she sees? Or did the long trip take a toll on her sanity? "Before Mars" takes place on an eerie, largely empty Mars after a giant corporation buys the rights to the planet.
12%
273 votes
Artificial Condition by Martha Wells -- It has a dark past – one in which a number of humans were killed. A past that caused it to christen itself "Murderbot". But it has only vague memories of the massacre that spawned that title, and it wants to know more. Teaming up with a Research Transport vessel named ART (you don't want to know what the "A" stands for), Murderbot heads to the mining facility where it went rogue. What it discovers will forever change the way it thinks..
9%
201 votes
The Oracle Year by Charles Soule -- From bestselling comic-book franchise writer Charles Soule comes a clever and witty first novel of a twentysomething New Yorker who wakes up one morning with the power to predict the future
8%
173 votes
None of them
74%
1,633 votes
There are somewhere between 600,000 and 1,000,000 books published every year in the US alone, depending on which stats you believe. Many of those – perhaps as many as half or even more – are self-published. With that many books, this list barely scratches the surface. Have you read any books this year that you would recommend?

5. There are somewhere between 600,000 and 1,000,000 books published every year in the US alone, depending on which stats you believe. Many of those – perhaps as many as half or even more – are self-published. With that many books, this list barely scratches the surface. Have you read any books this year that you would recommend?

Yes, and I may leave a suggestion or two in the comments
12%
254 votes
None that I can think of
17%
378 votes
I read a lot, but can't remember any right now
18%
394 votes
Yes, but you have actually listed them here
4%
81 votes
No, but I will probably read some of these on the list
8%
179 votes
No
25%
545 votes
Do not read
17%
369 votes
11/17/2018 Living 2257 55 By: Harriet56

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By: Harriet56