Results for - First She Gave Me Life; Now She Gave Us Our Life

2,251 voters participated in this survey
Cecile Eledge gave birth to her son's baby via surrogacy, joining a small group of women over 60 who have defied their age to give birth. She didn't think her 61-year-old body would be able to carry a baby, but with her son and his husband desperate to start a family, the loving mother was eager to help. Desperate to help her son, Matthew Eledge, 32, and son-in-law, Elliot Dougherty, 29 become parents, her only thought was

1. Cecile Eledge gave birth to her son's baby via surrogacy, joining a small group of women over 60 who have defied their age to give birth. She didn't think her 61-year-old body would be able to carry a baby, but with her son and his husband desperate to start a family, the loving mother was eager to help. Desperate to help her son, Matthew Eledge, 32, and son-in-law, Elliot Dougherty, 29 become parents, her only thought was "I wanted to do everything I humanly could to give these guys their gift." Matthew and Dougherty wed in 2015 and anticipated the challenges they'd have to overcome to become parents as a same-sex couple in Omaha, Nebraska. They turned to in vitro fertilization, with Dougherty's sister donating her eggs and Matthew using his sperm. When Cecile offered to be the surrogate, it came as a bit of a surprise, but the medical team was confident she could do it, given her physical condition, which they likened to a woman twenty years younger. Cecile gave birth to her granddaughter — her son's baby — Uma Louise Dougherty-Eledge, on March 25. Do you know any couples who turned to a surrogate to help them realize their dreams of becoming parents?

Yes
10%
220 votes
No
87%
1,907 votes
I did
2%
33 votes
I actually have been a surrogate for someone
2%
40 votes
When faced with obstacles in having children, some couples go to extreme measures to make these dreams a reality. And adoption is not always an answer. Some couples are lucky; the adoption goes smoothly. Increasingly, however, adoption is snarled, discouraging, and costly whether you adopt in domestically or internationally. That could be why only two percent of American and Canadian families adopt. While some experience no issues when having a family, many do. Have you or someone you know had a child using any of these methods?

2. When faced with obstacles in having children, some couples go to extreme measures to make these dreams a reality. And adoption is not always an answer. Some couples are lucky; the adoption goes smoothly. Increasingly, however, adoption is snarled, discouraging, and costly whether you adopt in domestically or internationally. That could be why only two percent of American and Canadian families adopt. While some experience no issues when having a family, many do. Have you or someone you know had a child using any of these methods?

Artificial insemination—of mother with father's sperm
8%
165 votes
Artificial insemination—of mother with donor sperm
5%
109 votes
Artificial insemination—with egg and sperm donors, using surrogate mother
3%
64 votes
In vitro fertilization (IVF)—using egg and sperm of parents
7%
163 votes
IVF—with Intra-Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI)
2%
36 votes
IVF—with frozen embryos
3%
64 votes
IVF—with Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD)
1%
23 votes
IVF—with egg and/or sperm donor
2%
37 votes
IVF—with surrogate and/or sperm and egg donor
1%
18 votes
Cytoplasmic transfer
0%
10 votes
Nuclear transfer and cloning
0%
10 votes
Adoption
24%
529 votes
None of the above ways
60%
1,329 votes
I have a friend who has three sisters, and all of them faced fertility issues. On sister chose to adopt, and they adopted a now seventeen year old daughter from China, as an infant. One sister went through countless invasive methods to try and get pregnant, and after years of trying, and many hardships, chose to have a baby through surrogacy -- using my friend (who had three children of her own) as the surrogate. So, my friend carried her sister's baby using her sister's egg and brother-in-law's sperm. That baby is now a fifteen year old girl who wants to become a fertility specialist when she grows up. (Thought that was an interesting career choice) The other sister and her husband ended up deciding the risks and cost was too much for them financially, so they are childless by circumstance (as opposed to choice) and are the most attentive and wonderful aunt and uncle they could possibly be. If you could not conceive children (hypothetically if you do have them), what would you do?

3. I have a friend who has three sisters, and all of them faced fertility issues. On sister chose to adopt, and they adopted a now seventeen year old daughter from China, as an infant. One sister went through countless invasive methods to try and get pregnant, and after years of trying, and many hardships, chose to have a baby through surrogacy -- using my friend (who had three children of her own) as the surrogate. So, my friend carried her sister's baby using her sister's egg and brother-in-law's sperm. That baby is now a fifteen year old girl who wants to become a fertility specialist when she grows up. (Thought that was an interesting career choice) The other sister and her husband ended up deciding the risks and cost was too much for them financially, so they are childless by circumstance (as opposed to choice) and are the most attentive and wonderful aunt and uncle they could possibly be. If you could not conceive children (hypothetically if you do have them), what would you do?

I would adopt
28%
610 votes
I would try any of the procedures listed above
7%
163 votes
I would try any of the procedures listed above, except the ones involving surrogacy
5%
102 votes
I would chose to remain childless
11%
245 votes
Not sure
23%
512 votes
Do not want children so this is not an issue for me
13%
294 votes
Cannot answer this question
20%
449 votes
Other (please specify)
2%
35 votes
06/26/2019 Parenting 2251 43 By: Harriet56

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By: Harriet56