Baby Boomers Enjoy Hugging More than Millennials By 20% Difference

Press Releases 04/11/2018
A Tellwut survey of just over 2000 North American respondents found that only 36% of Millennial respondents enjoyed giving and receiving hugs. That number increased by 20% for Baby Boomers, as 56% of those asked said that they enjoyed the act of hugging.

Women are also more likely than men to identify themselves as “huggers” – those who enjoy giving and receiving hugs, with slightly more than half self-identifying this way , coming in at 56% . The number drops by 16% for the men, as 40% of those asked said that they identified themselves as huggers. The wariness of sharing an embrace as a man is explained by one community member as, “I am a man and would only give a hug when it was initiated by the woman first, and only when there are other people around. Some people love hugs and others do not, so its always important to respect their personal space.”

The Me Too movement has brought on the spotlight about what is considered appropriate and inappropriate physical contact in the workplace amongst co-workers. 63% of men and 62% of women think its inappropriate to hug co-workers in a professional setting. In terms of generational segmentation, the group that was most okay with workplace hugs were those within Generation X as 41% of these individuals are comfortable hugging in a professional setting. One panel member dispenses a good rule of thumb, “hugging is ok in the work place as long as the other person says it's ok to hug them.” The Millennial group was the least receptive to the idea of hugs at work, with only at 31% feeling that hugs were okay in a professional setting.

In terms of greeting an acquaintance 48% of respondents said that they would hug feel comfortable hugging a person they only casually know. However upon initially meeting someone, less than quarter of respondents said they would feel comfortable greeting with a hug – specifically only 23% said they would feel at ease with this form of physical interaction.

The embrace from a hug creates an instant surge of oxytocin (which is known as the love hormone). The release of oxytocin has both mental and physical benefits such as decreasing heart disease and alleviating stress. Almost 70% of women believe that a hug decreases the feeling of loneliness, whereas as only 57% of men feel this way. The proof may be in the pudding for Tellwut’s female respondents, as researchers at the University of North Carolina have found that women recorded greater reductions in blood pressure than men after their hugs.

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