Results for - The Millennial urban lifestyle Is about to get more expensive

2,352 voters participated in this survey

(Source: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/10/say-goodbye-millennial-urban-lifestyle/599839/?utm_source=pocket&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pockethits) As WeWork crashes and Uber bleeds cash, the consumer-tech gold rush may be coming to an end. Starting about a decade ago, a fleet of well-known start-ups promised to change the way we work, work out, eat, shop, cook, commute, and sleep. These lifestyle-adjustment companies were so influential that wannabe entrepreneurs saw them as a template, flooding Silicon Valley with “Uber for X” pitches. But as their promises soared, their profits didn’t.

1. If you wake up on a Casper mattress, work out with a Peloton before breakfast, Uber to your desk at a WeWork, order DoorDash for lunch, take a Lyft home, and get dinner through Postmates, you've interacted with seven companies that will collectively lose nearly $14 billion this year. If you use Lime scooters to bop around the city, download Wag to walk your dog, and sign up for Blue Apron to make a meal, that's three more brands that have never recorded a dime in earnings, or have seen their valuations fall by more than 50 percent. Were you aware about these facts?

Yes
11%
261 votes
No
89%
2,039 votes

2. To maximize customer growth they have strategically—or at least "strategically"—throttled their prices, in effect providing a massive consumer subsidy. You might call it the Millennial Lifestyle Sponsorship, in which consumer tech companies, along with their venture-capital backers, help fund the daily habits of their disproportionately young and urban user base. With each Uber ride, WeWork membership, and hand-delivered dinner, the typical consumer has been getting a sweetheart deal. Do you use these or similar apps?

Yes
11%
249 votes
No
69%
1,579 votes
Not Applicable
21%
472 votes

3. The idea that companies like Uber and WeWork and DoorDash don't make a profit might come as a shock to the many people who spend a fair amount of their take-home pay each month on ride-hailing, shared office space, or meal delivery. If you use consumer apps, would you mind paying a bit more to keep using them?

Yes
16%
358 votes
No
30%
679 votes
Not Applicable
55%
1,263 votes

4. The meal-kit company Blue Apron revealed before its public offering that the company was spending about $460 to recruit each new member, despite making less than $400 per customer. From afar, the company looked like a powerhouse. But from a unit-economics standpoint—that is, by looking at the difference between customer value and customer cost—Blue Apron wasn't a "company" so much as a dual-subsidy stream: first, sponsoring cooks by refusing to raise prices on ingredients to a break-even level; and second, by enriching podcast producers. Little surprise, then, that since Blue Apron went public, the firm's valuation has crashed by more than 95 percent. Are you subscribed to a meal-kit company?

Yes
6%
130 votes
No
72%
1,651 votes
Not Applicable
23%
519 votes

5. For years, corporate promises rose as profits fell. What's coming next is the promise-profit convergence. Talk of global conquest will abate. Prices will rise—for scooters, for Uber, for Lyft, for food delivery, and more. And the great consumer subsidy will get squeezed. Eating out and eating in, ride-hailing and office-sharing, all of it will get a little more expensive. It was a good deal while it lasted. Will this increase in the prices affect how much you use these apps?

Yes
16%
365 votes
No
19%
435 votes
Undecided
10%
236 votes
Not Applicable
55%
1,264 votes
11/06/2019 Business 2352 47 By: LBP

Comments

Load more comments...
Loading...
LBP profile photo
By: LBP