Results for - Do Not Touch My Clothes -- Afghani Women Call Out Taliban By Posing In Traditional Dress

2,291 voters participated in this survey
Afghani women around the world are posing in colourful traditional dresses online to hit back against the Taliban's strict new clothing requirements for women in schools. Based on their interpretation of sharia law, the Taliban has recently ordered all classrooms to be segregated based on gender, and mandated that all female students and teachers wear hijabs. Recent photos on social media show a group of female students covered entirely in long black robes and waving Taliban flags in the government-run university in Kabul. But many Afghani women are pushing back saying their own traditional clothing looks nothing like that. Have you ever seen traditional Afghani clothing in photos or at celebrations?

1. Afghani women around the world are posing in colourful traditional dresses online to hit back against the Taliban's strict new clothing requirements for women in schools. Based on their interpretation of sharia law, the Taliban has recently ordered all classrooms to be segregated based on gender, and mandated that all female students and teachers wear hijabs. Recent photos on social media show a group of female students covered entirely in long black robes and waving Taliban flags in the government-run university in Kabul. But many Afghani women are pushing back saying their own traditional clothing looks nothing like that. Have you ever seen traditional Afghani clothing in photos or at celebrations?

Yes
19%
418 votes
No, and I thought that the hijab is their traditional clothing
20%
435 votes
No
41%
891 votes
Not sure
19%
421 votes
I am Afghani and aware of what the traditional clothing looks like
2%
35 votes
The online campaign began over a week ago when Bahar Jalali, a former history professor at the American University in Afghanistan, tweeted a photo of herself in a bright, green Afghan dress with flowers embroidered onto a red backdrop. She posted it using the hashtag #AfghanistanCulture, and the next day, she used #DoNotTouchMyClothes for another photo of herself.

2. The online campaign began over a week ago when Bahar Jalali, a former history professor at the American University in Afghanistan, tweeted a photo of herself in a bright, green Afghan dress with flowers embroidered onto a red backdrop. She posted it using the hashtag #AfghanistanCulture, and the next day, she used #DoNotTouchMyClothes for another photo of herself. "We will not let our culture to be appropriated by those who want to erase us," she wrote. In the days that followed, many Afghans, mostly women, followed her lead on Twitter and Instagram. Clothes may not be a priority in a country facing what Afghanistan is at the risk of experiencing, but they are a universal symbol of expression and the campaign is gaining momentum. Do you feel this is a strong, appropriate campaign?

Yes
52%
1,139 votes
No
15%
338 votes
Undecided
33%
723 votes

3. "It's important the world sees what traditional Afghan clothes really are. Their beauty, the workmanship, the vibrant colors represent the country and its heritage," says Afghani Montreal resident Dr. Fatima Kakkar, . "Every Afghan woman I know cherishes their traditional Afghan dress and wears it with pride. So it was important to reinforce that visually." She called the social media campaign a small but public way to "stand in solidarity" with the women facing oppression and growing restrictions in Afghanistan. This is similar to the social media campaign a few years ago, by Iranian woman, who posted photos exposing their hair in public places. Started by a good friend of my husband's and mine, Iranian journalist Masih Alinejad, under the hashtag #MyStealthyFreedom, she empowered millions of woman to protest against the mandatory hijab law, by exposing their hair in public, and posting to social media -- something that is punishable by fines, jail or even death in Iran. She was recently the target of an Iranian kidnap plot, discovered by the U.S. government. Do you admire these woman who are literally risking their very lives to stand up to these oppressive rules?

Of course
68%
1,503 votes
Not sure
21%
460 votes
No
11%
237 votes
09/26/2021 News 2291 44 By: Harriet56
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By: Harriet56
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