Results for - The Department of Redundancy Department

1,651 voters participated in this survey

1. In the English language it commonly occurs that one term (a word or phrase) is paired with another where one of them is simply a reiteration of the other or is used to modify what is already implied by the other. "Lift up" is an example of this because the word "up" is already implied by the word "lift". "Moonlighting on the side" is another example since "moonlighting" already means something that is done "on the side". Sometimes these redundant expressions are used purposely for emphasis but usually they occur unintentionally being so engrained in the language that we hardly pay them any mind. Since they are so common is there at least one from the following list that you periodically find yourself using? (unnecessary word or phrase in parenthesis)

(close) proximity
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(false) pretense
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skipped (over)
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(safe) haven
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(free) gift
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flew (through the air)
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combine (together)
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(added) bonus
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None of these /Not Applicable
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2. It's hard to imagine there is any English speaker who hasn't used each of those at least once. Here are some more... how many of these are you intimately familiar with?

(temper) tantrum
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(armed) gunman
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(unconfirmed) rumor
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(advance) warning
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(past) history
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(foreign) imports
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few (in number)
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(basic) fundamentals
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None of these /Not Applicable
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3. Are there any other examples of this that you often hear and/or find somewhat humorous? (If so, you can leave a comment below.)

Yes
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No
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09/24/2015 Education 1651 33 Anonymous
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