Results for - The Battle Of The Bagels — Really We All Win With This One!

2,278 voters participated in this survey
Who doesn't love a good bagel? A good bagel is not hard to find. And it seems everyone has their own preference, although in some places what claims to be a bagel is just bread shaped like a bagel. But two cities stake a claim for the hearts of bagel lovers, each with its own unique style and history: New York and Montreal. First off, do you enjoy bagels in general?

1. Who doesn't love a good bagel? A good bagel is not hard to find. And it seems everyone has their own preference, although in some places what claims to be a bagel is just bread shaped like a bagel. But two cities stake a claim for the hearts of bagel lovers, each with its own unique style and history: New York and Montreal. First off, do you enjoy bagels in general?

Love bagels
47%
1,080 votes
They're OK, but not a big bagel lover
37%
848 votes
Do not like bagels
10%
228 votes
Can't eat bagels for dietary/health reasons
3%
60 votes
Have never seen and/or eaten a bagel
4%
84 votes
New York definitely has bragging rights when it comes to bagels. Many think great tap water makes local bagels distinct. But bagels became a trademark of Manhattan out of circumstance, not taste or texture — though that's what has made them famous. While the true origins of the basic concept of a ring of bread trace back to multiple countries, the boiled-then-baked version was a Jewish tradition in Poland before it reached the States. European immigrants brought flavors of home to New York's Lower East Side, where bakeries abounded in the 1800s. Many NYC bakeries and delis still use recipes and processes that have been passed down through generations to bake fresh bagels daily. Have you ever had a New York bagel?

2. New York definitely has bragging rights when it comes to bagels. Many think great tap water makes local bagels distinct. But bagels became a trademark of Manhattan out of circumstance, not taste or texture — though that's what has made them famous. While the true origins of the basic concept of a ring of bread trace back to multiple countries, the boiled-then-baked version was a Jewish tradition in Poland before it reached the States. European immigrants brought flavors of home to New York's Lower East Side, where bakeries abounded in the 1800s. Many NYC bakeries and delis still use recipes and processes that have been passed down through generations to bake fresh bagels daily. Have you ever had a New York bagel?

Yes
27%
628 votes
No
73%
1,672 votes
Authentic Montreal bagels are boiled in water with honey, and as a result are sweeter than New York bagels. But the bigger difference is that they are cooked in wood-fired ovens, which gives them a crunchier crust and a deeper, richer crust flavor. Montreal bagels have a much bigger hole, mainly as a result of the dough tube that forms the bagel being notably thinner than New York style. For this reason, while Montreal bagels are excellent on their own or with spreads, they don't make for as user-friendly a sandwich. This is especially true with messier breakfast sandwiches. In general, Montreal shops do fewer flavors than are found in New York, but often some odder ones. The standards are similar: plain, sesame, poppy, cinnamon raisin, whole wheat and everything — except they call this version

3. Authentic Montreal bagels are boiled in water with honey, and as a result are sweeter than New York bagels. But the bigger difference is that they are cooked in wood-fired ovens, which gives them a crunchier crust and a deeper, richer crust flavor. Montreal bagels have a much bigger hole, mainly as a result of the dough tube that forms the bagel being notably thinner than New York style. For this reason, while Montreal bagels are excellent on their own or with spreads, they don't make for as user-friendly a sandwich. This is especially true with messier breakfast sandwiches. In general, Montreal shops do fewer flavors than are found in New York, but often some odder ones. The standards are similar: plain, sesame, poppy, cinnamon raisin, whole wheat and everything — except they call this version "all dressed." Have you had a Montreal bagel?

Yes
19%
436 votes
No
81%
1,864 votes
If you have had Montreal style and New York style, which do you prefer?

4. If you have had Montreal style and New York style, which do you prefer?

Montreal style
8%
195 votes
New York style
10%
226 votes
Have not had both to say which is better
38%
882 votes
I've had both but prefer a bagel from elsewhere
3%
60 votes
Have not had either style/do not eat bagels
41%
937 votes
According to bagel expert and Jewish food writer Jeremy Glass, there are only six kinds of acceptable bagels -- Everything, Egg, Pumpernickel, Onion, Poppy Seed or Plain. Everything else, he claims, is a

5. According to bagel expert and Jewish food writer Jeremy Glass, there are only six kinds of acceptable bagels -- Everything, Egg, Pumpernickel, Onion, Poppy Seed or Plain. Everything else, he claims, is a "travesty". Well, I may add my favorite, sesame seed to the list, and once in a while I like a cinnamon raisin bagel (sorry mom, I know what you are thinking -- no raisins in a self-respecting bagel!), but I do agree that some of the flavors of bagels just go to a strange place. Are there any on this list that you would/have tried?

French toast bagel
23%
522 votes
Jalapeno bagel
11%
258 votes
Bacon, egg and cheese bagel
24%
556 votes
Sweet potato bagel
9%
208 votes
Salt and vinegar bagel
6%
127 votes
Apple pie bagels
14%
333 votes
Red beet bagels
4%
87 votes
Grilled banana bagels
7%
169 votes
Pumpkin pie bagels
11%
262 votes
Blueberry bagels
35%
808 votes
None of the above
28%
638 votes
I'd try all of them
11%
262 votes
Chocolate chip bagels
22%
497 votes
03/11/2019 Food & Drink 2278 42 By: Harriet56

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By: Harriet56