Results for - The Vaccination Debate

2,277 voters participated in this survey
Measles, a highly contagious disease that was considered eliminated in 2000, is making a comeback. Outbreaks have been reported this year in New York, Texas, and Washington State, as well as in Canada and overseas. The underlying reason for this appears to be fear and misinformation about vaccination, much of it spread through social media. Most measles cases occur among unvaccinated individuals, despite the existence of a highly effective vaccine. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one dose of measles vaccine is about 93 percent effective at preventing the disease, and two doses are 97 percent effective in people exposed to the virus. Yet the anti-vaccination debate rages on. What side of the debate are you on?

1. Measles, a highly contagious disease that was considered eliminated in 2000, is making a comeback. Outbreaks have been reported this year in New York, Texas, and Washington State, as well as in Canada and overseas. The underlying reason for this appears to be fear and misinformation about vaccination, much of it spread through social media. Most measles cases occur among unvaccinated individuals, despite the existence of a highly effective vaccine. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one dose of measles vaccine is about 93 percent effective at preventing the disease, and two doses are 97 percent effective in people exposed to the virus. Yet the anti-vaccination debate rages on. What side of the debate are you on?

Pro-vaccination
54%
1,184 votes
Anti-vaccination
7%
150 votes
Pro "most" vaccinations, except for the influenza vaccination
10%
223 votes
Pro-vaccination, unless there in a medical reason for not vaccinating
14%
305 votes
Not sure
15%
338 votes
A pair of state lawmakers are pushing a measure to allow some New York minors to decide to be vaccinated against their parents' wishes. Sen. Liz Krueger, D-Manhattan, and Assemblywoman Patricia Fahy, D-Albany, said Friday they will soon introduce a bill that would let those 14 and older to receive an immunization without parental consent. The bill was inspired by the testimony of Ethan Lindenberger, an 18-year-old from Ohio who spoke to Congress last week about his decision to be immunized even though his mother opposed it. It comes as New York continues to deal with a measles outbreak in New York City and the lower Hudson Valley, including Rockland County, which has had at least 144 confirmed cases since October, many in the county's Orthodox Jewish communities. Children in New York are required to be immunized for measles, poliomyelitis, mumps, diphtheria, rubella, HiB, hepatitis B and varicella. But the state allows exemptions for those with religious beliefs against immunizations or if a physician certifies it could damage a child's health because of some other conflicting condition. Some Democratic lawmakers have called for closing the religious exemptions, arguing that high vaccination rates are critical to ensure children avoid getting sick. Do you agree with either of these two statements?

2. A pair of state lawmakers are pushing a measure to allow some New York minors to decide to be vaccinated against their parents' wishes. Sen. Liz Krueger, D-Manhattan, and Assemblywoman Patricia Fahy, D-Albany, said Friday they will soon introduce a bill that would let those 14 and older to receive an immunization without parental consent. The bill was inspired by the testimony of Ethan Lindenberger, an 18-year-old from Ohio who spoke to Congress last week about his decision to be immunized even though his mother opposed it. It comes as New York continues to deal with a measles outbreak in New York City and the lower Hudson Valley, including Rockland County, which has had at least 144 confirmed cases since October, many in the county's Orthodox Jewish communities. Children in New York are required to be immunized for measles, poliomyelitis, mumps, diphtheria, rubella, HiB, hepatitis B and varicella. But the state allows exemptions for those with religious beliefs against immunizations or if a physician certifies it could damage a child's health because of some other conflicting condition. Some Democratic lawmakers have called for closing the religious exemptions, arguing that high vaccination rates are critical to ensure children avoid getting sick. Do you agree with either of these two statements?

The religious exemption for vaccines should be overturned and vaccines should be mandatory in all cases, except health reasons
42%
927 votes
Minors over the age of 14 should be allowed to get vaccinated without parental approval
29%
631 votes
Do not agree with either of these
29%
642 votes
Here is some misinformation that anti-vaxxers are spreading about vaccines (all of which has been scientifically refuted) -- some even in major billboard campaigns recently. Do you believe any of these are true?

3. Here is some misinformation that anti-vaxxers are spreading about vaccines (all of which has been scientifically refuted) -- some even in major billboard campaigns recently. Do you believe any of these are true?

Vaccines Cause Autism -- Individuals and autism organizations who are trying to keep the focus on a link between vaccines and autism are actually doing a great harm to autistic children, autistic adults, and their families. How can they get support when these anti-vaccination folks continue to focus on vaccines as a cause for autism? VACCINES DO NOT CAUSE AUTISM
4%
82 votes
Vaccines Contain More Mercury Now Than Ever -- Many anti-vaccine folks moved on to worrying about other vaccine ingredients and additives once thimerosal was removed from vaccines back in 1999. There are still some who cling to the idea that many vaccines still contain thimerosal and to the fully debunked idea that thimerosal in vaccines causes autism. In addition to the fact that thimerosal was removed from almost all vaccines beginning in 1999, many vaccines never contained thimerosal, including: MMR, Varivax (chicken pox vaccine), hepatitis A vaccine, Flumist, rotavirus vaccines (RotaTeq and Rotarix), TdaP, IPV (polio vaccine), Menactra and Menveo, HPV vaccines (Gardasil and Cervarix), Prevnar (both Prevnar 7 and Prevnar 13)
4%
88 votes
No One Else Is at Risk If I Don't Vaccinate My Kids -- A common idea that folks who are anti-vaccine use to justify their decision to themselves is to think that "if vaccines work so well, then your kids aren't at any risk if I choose to not vaccinate or selectively vaccinate my kids." Of course, intentionally unvaccinated kids and adults do pose a risk to others, especially those who are too young to be vaccinated and those with immune system problems, who can't be vaccinated. Unvaccinated children and adults are also responsible for starting most of the outbreaks that we continue to see today, including the measles outbreaks that are costing millions of dollars to contain.
3%
57 votes
Vaccines Don't Really Work -- Vaccines are effective and work very well to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases.
2%
43 votes
Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Aren't Really That Serious -- This is one of the more dangerous ideas of the anti-vaccine movement. The only reason that they get away with it is because vaccines have done such a good job! Since vaccines have eliminated and reduced most vaccine-preventable diseases, few people actually remember just how devastating these life-threatening diseases can be.
2%
33 votes
All of them
11%
241 votes
Do not believe any of these to be true
75%
1,656 votes
03/14/2019 Health & Fitness 2277 63 By: Harriet56

Comments

Load more comments...
Loading...
Harriet56 profile photo
By: Harriet56