Results for - Shape-shifters

1,740 voters participated in this survey

While shape-shifters have been a myth for humanity, nature showed us that shape-shifting can be quite real for some species. Let´s take a closer look to the octopus and the cuttlefish and see how the manage to become invisible for predators and preys.

1. Cuttlefish are colorblind, but that is not a limitation when they use their electric skin to emulate patterns of anything they are standing on. They can also change the sculpture of their skin with bands of circular muscle. As they contract, the near liquid in the center gets forced up as little nodes, or spikes, or flat blades that stick up to take on the appearance of kelp or rock. By adding that structural component, the cuttlefish gets rid of outline and profile, and predators that are looking for shapes will be confused. Cuttlefish have relied on invisibility for protection. Do you know any other animals that can be described as shape shifters?

Yes
16%
274 votes
No
84%
1,466 votes

2. The mimic octopus, a master of disguise, was discovered in 1998 off the coast of Indonesia and Malaysia. To escape from predators, its mimicry of different poisonous creatures serves as its best defense. This octopus mimics venomous sole, lion fish, sea snakes, sea anemones, and jellyfish. Mimicry also helps it to prey upon animals that would ordinarily flee an octopus: it can imitate a crab as an apparent mate, only to devour it. Can you mention any other animals that imitate other species as an apparent mate only to hunt them?

Yes
13%
225 votes
No
87%
1,515 votes

3. The Maldives octopuses change coloration for camouflage, they are nocturnal, and throughout the day they hide among the rocks. If they don´t find shelter, they make it by piling up rocks. The octopuses are very flexible. Being their eyes the most rigid organ, if the eye passes through a hole, all body will pass too. It can introduce their tentacles in almost any small coral holes. Are there any animals you know as flexible as an octopus?

Yes
13%
221 votes
No
87%
1,519 votes

4. The Coconut Octopus is named so for a very peculiar behavior: it carries coconut shells and clam shells across the Indian ocean floor and uses them to build fortresses. It is the only invertebrate known to use tools, and one of only two octopuses known to exhibit bipedal behavior by "walking" on two of its legs. Although octopuses often use foreign objects as shelter, the sophisticated behavior of Coconut Octopus when they select materials, carry and reassemble them, is far more complex. Coconut Octopus's use of coconuts shells and clam shells has fascinated scientists, mainly because this is the first invertebrate known to carry and maintain objects for future use. Did you know about them before this survey?

Yes
10%
174 votes
No
90%
1,566 votes
12/31/2015 Living 1740 26 By: LBP

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By: LBP