Results for - "Oy Vey"

1,356 voters participated in this survey
*Chabad* Oy and vey are two very old Jewish interjections which both mean

1. *Chabad* Oy and vey are two very old Jewish interjections which both mean "woe." Oy is found many times in the Bible (see Numbers 21:29, I Samuel 4:7 and Isaiah 3:11 for a few examples). Vey is newer than oy; it is oy's Aramaic equivalent. Are you familiar with the two words, Oy Vey?

Yes
48%
647 votes
No
37%
504 votes
Undecided
5%
68 votes
Not Applicable
10%
137 votes
Today, oy and vey are often used together.

2. Today, oy and vey are often used together. "Oy vey" is the ethnically Jewish way to react when you find out how much your son's root canal will cost, or when you find out that there is a two-hour wait time for a table at the restaurant where you just arrived. Sometimes you'll hear people groan "oy vavoy," which is Hebrew for "oy vey." Those who prefer Yiddish lamentations will often cry "vey iz mir," which means "woe is to me." Which do you like best? Oy Vey or Vey iz mir?

Oy Vey
50%
673 votes
Vey iz mir
8%
110 votes
Neither
42%
573 votes
Have you ever said, just ... Oy!?

3. Have you ever said, just ... Oy!?

Yes
31%
425 votes
No
48%
650 votes
Not Applicable
21%
281 votes
Saying Oy Vey or Oy is not profane, nor does it use G-d's name in vain. If you don't have a politically correct word to use in mixed company, do you think you might start using Oy or Oy Vey?

4. Saying Oy Vey or Oy is not profane, nor does it use G-d's name in vain. If you don't have a politically correct word to use in mixed company, do you think you might start using Oy or Oy Vey?

Yes
18%
247 votes
No
37%
502 votes
Undecided
16%
222 votes
Not Applicable
28%
385 votes
01/02/2016 Living 1356 21 By: ptajuggalette

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