Results for - It's all Fakakta

1,632 voters participated in this survey

sh'ma eysra'eil adonai eloheinu adonai etshad.

Here are a list of some popular Yiddish words. Which ones are you familiar with?

1. Here are a list of some popular Yiddish words. Which ones are you familiar with?

1. Verklempt: filled with so much emotion
20%
320 votes
2. Schpilkes: overwhelmed or nervous
3%
56 votes
3. Oy Gevalt: shocked
17%
280 votes
4. Shmutz: stains on clothing
22%
358 votes
5. Fakakta: something silly or ridiculous
6%
102 votes
6. Bubbala: endearing term, from grandma to grandkids
21%
335 votes
7. Shana Punum: beautiful face
4%
71 votes
8. Mishpucha: you are the extended family
4%
68 votes
9. Shiksa: non-Jewish girl
21%
338 votes
10. Plotz: to freak out with excitement
8%
127 votes
11. Schtick: a person's actions or act
26%
426 votes
12. Spiel: a long story
34%
552 votes
13. Tchatchke: a toy or item, knick-knack
13%
213 votes
14. Tuches: one's bottom
22%
357 votes
15. Nosh: food or snack
28%
453 votes
16. Chutzpah: courage or bravery
30%
486 votes
17. Kvetshed: to whine or complain
10%
167 votes
18. Shlep: to drag someone or something around
28%
456 votes
19. Mench: someone who does good deads
16%
264 votes
20. Mazel Tov: good luck
36%
594 votes
N/A
39%
636 votes
Did you know that all these words were Yiddish?

2. Did you know that all these words were Yiddish?

Yes
25%
413 votes
No
50%
816 votes
Undecided
6%
91 votes
Not Applicable
19%
312 votes
Yiddish is the historical language of the Ashkenazi Jews, originating in the 9th century in Central Europe; providing the nascent Ashkenazi community with an extensive Germanic based vernacular fused with elements taken from Hebrew and Aramaic, as well as from Slavic languages and traces of Romance languages. My Great Grandma Rose was raised in a home that only spoke Yiddish (She learned English when she went to school). Do you have any family that speak Yiddish or did speak Yiddish?

3. Yiddish is the historical language of the Ashkenazi Jews, originating in the 9th century in Central Europe; providing the nascent Ashkenazi community with an extensive Germanic based vernacular fused with elements taken from Hebrew and Aramaic, as well as from Slavic languages and traces of Romance languages. My Great Grandma Rose was raised in a home that only spoke Yiddish (She learned English when she went to school). Do you have any family that speak Yiddish or did speak Yiddish?

Yes
8%
125 votes
No
67%
1,092 votes
Undecided
4%
69 votes
Not Applicable
21%
346 votes
My family, dating back to the 1800s lived in Loslau, Poland and were under Czech rule. They were and I am an Ashkenaz Polish Jew. Because the word Ashkenazi has the word Nazi, I refuse to use it and say, instead, Ashkenaz (Aush - ken - nazsch). I do not know much about the German language, maybe it's not a big deal that Nazi is the end of Ashkenazi, but it bugs me. Do you find it strange that a type of Jew has the name of who killed so many?

4. My family, dating back to the 1800s lived in Loslau, Poland and were under Czech rule. They were and I am an Ashkenaz Polish Jew. Because the word Ashkenazi has the word Nazi, I refuse to use it and say, instead, Ashkenaz (Aush - ken - nazsch). I do not know much about the German language, maybe it's not a big deal that Nazi is the end of Ashkenazi, but it bugs me. Do you find it strange that a type of Jew has the name of who killed so many?

Yes
16%
269 votes
Somewhat
15%
249 votes
Not sure
24%
399 votes
Not really, it can be explained by language
20%
324 votes
Not at all
24%
391 votes
The Modern Language Society says there are less than 200,000 Yiddish speakers in the US, most of these are Hasidic and live in New York. (Then California, Florida, Arizona). Because there are so few, I am learning the language now. If you took a language in middle or high school and then as an adult, which was easier?

5. The Modern Language Society says there are less than 200,000 Yiddish speakers in the US, most of these are Hasidic and live in New York. (Then California, Florida, Arizona). Because there are so few, I am learning the language now. If you took a language in middle or high school and then as an adult, which was easier?

Easier to learn as an adolescent or teen than an adult
21%
343 votes
Both are about the same
6%
106 votes
Easier as an adult
5%
75 votes
Not sure
13%
211 votes
It depends on the language
12%
193 votes
N/A
43%
704 votes
I have a Hasidic friend who knows Aramaic, Hebrew, Yiddish, and English. Can you speak at least 4 different languages, if yes, then at what age did you learn them?

6. I have a Hasidic friend who knows Aramaic, Hebrew, Yiddish, and English. Can you speak at least 4 different languages, if yes, then at what age did you learn them?

Yes, I speak at least 4 learning them before the age of 18
4%
58 votes
Yes, but learned them at different stages
5%
87 votes
Yes, learning them all over the age of 18
3%
50 votes
No
88%
1,437 votes
Living 1632 50 By: ptajuggalette

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