Results for - Rooted In Racism

2,308 voters participated in this survey
Companies are finally changing mascots and logos that have long been criticized as racist. While much of the criticism of brands such as Aunt Jemima and Cream of Wheat has been going on for decades, the recent killing of George Floyd and the following protests are helping force companies to make long overdue changes. Companies are acknowledging the racist origins and connotations of their brands, and instead of saying

1. Companies are finally changing mascots and logos that have long been criticized as racist. While much of the criticism of brands such as Aunt Jemima and Cream of Wheat has been going on for decades, the recent killing of George Floyd and the following protests are helping force companies to make long overdue changes. Companies are acknowledging the racist origins and connotations of their brands, and instead of saying "we've always used this name" or "it's part of history", they are opting to change instead of excuse. Do you admire companies for enacting change now?

Yes
33%
764 votes
No
41%
934 votes
Undecided
26%
602 votes
Land O'Lakes announced plans to change its packaging back in February, removing the drawing of a Native American woman, which was an offensive racial stereotype. Maybe understanding the racist origins of these brands or names will make you understand why this change is long overdue -- were you already aware of the racist origins of these names?

2. Land O'Lakes announced plans to change its packaging back in February, removing the drawing of a Native American woman, which was an offensive racial stereotype. Maybe understanding the racist origins of these brands or names will make you understand why this change is long overdue -- were you already aware of the racist origins of these names?

The Aunt Jemima brand has been criticized for years. The inspiration for the name was a minstrel song and the brand continued to be linked to racism in the eyes of many. The Aunt Jemima logo was an outgrowth of Old South plantation nostalgia and romance grounded in an idea about the 'mammy,' a devoted and submissive servant who eagerly nurtured the children of her white master and mistress while neglecting her own
36%
839 votes
Mars said they plan to change the name of Uncle Ben's rice brand, because the name of the brand is linked to the practice of white Southerners calling older Black people "aunt" and "uncle" because they refused to use "Mr." or "Mrs."
23%
533 votes
Mrs. Butterworth's plans to conduct a "complete brand and packaging review." Similar to Aunt Jemima, the Mrs. Butterworth's brand has been criticized for perpetuating the offensive "mammy" stereotype, which positions Black women as subservient.
22%
505 votes
B&G Foods announced it was reviewing the chef mascot which features prominently on its Cream of Wheat brand. The chef was once featured in advertising as "Rastus," a pejorative term associated with Black men.
11%
243 votes
Colgate announced it planned to change the name of Darlie, a Chinese toothpaste brand that used to be called "Darkie." The brand used to feature a man in blackface as its logo, and that its Chinese name continues to translate as "Black person toothpaste."
5%
104 votes
Knew about all of these
13%
293 votes
None
48%
1,110 votes
Just because we have always known a product by the offensive name, does not mean that it should continue -- are you also familiar with these racist names of brands and mascots over the years?

3. Just because we have always known a product by the offensive name, does not mean that it should continue -- are you also familiar with these racist names of brands and mascots over the years?

The NFL's Washington Redskins -- The word "redskin" is a racist slang term for America's indigenous people.
42%
973 votes
Fritos Bandito -- Speaking broken English and robbing unsuspecting bystanders, the Frito Bandito was an armed Mexican conman with a disheveled look and a gold tooth.
25%
575 votes
Cleveland Indians -- The Indians announced plans to remove the logo from their uniforms in 2018. The move came after decades of protests and complaints that the grinning, red-faced caricature used in one version or another since 1947 was racist
39%
890 votes
Sambo's -- When restaurateurs Sam Battistone and Newell Bohnett launched Sambo's, they insisted its name had nothing to do with a children's book of the time, "The Story of Little Black Sambo." But the businessmen capitalized on the association, with "Little Black Sambo"-inspired decor.
19%
439 votes
Pillsbury Funny Face drink mix -- Injun Orange and Chinese Cherry are actual varieties of Funny Face, and the racist overtones didn't stop at the names: Caricatures accompanied each of the flavors.
8%
175 votes
Knew about all of these
13%
296 votes
None
38%
883 votes
Perpetuating racial stereotypes is wrong, and changing a name or brand, although costly, is the right thing to do. Some feel that since it has been around for so long, it should not be changed. Specifically for the Uncle Ben's brand, but pertinent to all these brands, Mars said in a statement this week,

4. Perpetuating racial stereotypes is wrong, and changing a name or brand, although costly, is the right thing to do. Some feel that since it has been around for so long, it should not be changed. Specifically for the Uncle Ben's brand, but pertinent to all these brands, Mars said in a statement this week, "As a global brand, we know we have a responsibility to take a stand in helping to put an end to racial bias and injustices. As we listen to the voices of consumers, especially in the Black community, and to the voices of our Associates worldwide, we recognize that one way we can do this is by evolving the Uncle Ben's brand, including its visual brand identity." Do you agree with this statement?

Yes
34%
786 votes
No
35%
815 votes
Undecided
30%
699 votes
06/27/2020 Products 2308 156 By: Harriet56

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By: Harriet56