Results for - The Paw Project

2,100 voters participated in this survey

1. The Paw Project is a documentary that focuses on the declawing of cats in the U.S. The film also follows the crusade of a veterinarian who campaigns to have declawing banned in a several cities in California. Have you seen this documentary?

Yes
6%
119 votes
No
94%
1,981 votes

2. Declawing is more accurately described by the term de-knuckling and is not merely the removal of the claws, as the term "declawing" implies. In humans, fingernails grow from the skin, but in animals that hunt prey, the claws grow from the bone; therefore, the last bone is amputated so the claw cannot re-grow. The last bone of each of the ten front toes of a cat's paw is amputated. Also, the tendons, nerves, and ligaments that enable normal function and movement of the paw are severed. An analogous procedure applied to humans would be cutting off each finger at the last joint. Did you know that declawing was such an invasive procedure?

Yes
27%
568 votes
No
52%
1,096 votes
Undecided
6%
123 votes
Not Applicable
15%
313 votes

3. Complications of declawing include refusal to use the litter box (sore paws), biting, surgical complications, joint stiffness, arthritis and death from anesthetic complications, defenselessness, and being taken to an animal shelter or abandoned due to behavioral problems. Declawing is considered one of the most painful, routinely-performed surgeries in all of veterinary medicine and yet 30% or more of veterinarians don't provide any pain medication whatsoever to their declaw patients. Another study showed that declawed cats were still in pain from the surgery at the end of the study, which was 12 days after the operation! Determining pain in cats is much more difficult than determining pain in dogs. Cats are very often stoical and people will interpret a cat curled up in a ball and sleeping as normal, when in reality, the cat is in a lot of pain. Dogs are more demonstrative of their pain. While the immediate post-surgical pain that the cats suffer is obviously severe, it is impossible to know how much chronic pain and suffering declawing causes. Declawing is ten (front toes only) or eighteen (there are only 8 toes on the back feet) separate amputations, so it is not unreasonable to believe that declawed cats experience phantom pain in one or more toes. (Many human amputees report life-long, painful "phantom" sensations from the amputated part.) Cats typically conceal pain or illness until it becomes unbearable. With chronic pain, it may be that they simply learn to live with it. Their behavior may appear normal, but a lack of overt signs of pain does not mean they are pain-free. Do you think declawing is humane?

Yes
13%
268 votes
No
52%
1,083 votes
Undecided
20%
414 votes
Not Applicable
16%
335 votes

4. The estimates of the prevalence of declawing vary considerably. It seems that 25%–43% of all cats in American homes are declawed. The reason for this high number is that many veterinarians actively market and recommend the procedure without disclosing the details of the procedure to their clients with cats. Others perform declawing unquestioningly. Many people with cats don't understand that declawing is amputating the bones and think they are doing "all the right things" for their beloved animal. A survey of twenty Los Angeles area veterinary clinics, reported in the February-March 2003 issue of The Pet Press, found that 75% agreed to perform declawing without question and without any attempt to establish a medical, behavioral, or any other indication to justify the procedure. Not only is declaw-on-demand the norm, the staff at veterinary clinics commonly encourage clients, whose cats are scheduled for spaying or neutering, to "supersize" the procedure by adding declaw surgery. Clients who bring their cats to these veterinarians typically report that neither the nature of the procedure, complications, nor humane alternatives is ever discussed. Humane alternatives to declawing include training the cat to use a scratching post, double-sided sticky tape on furniture to deter scratching, regular nail trimming, and vinyl nail caps. If you had a cat, would you still choose to declaw them knowing the pros and cons of both options?

Yes
8%
177 votes
No
52%
1,096 votes
Undecided
17%
356 votes
Not Applicable
22%
471 votes
07/05/2014 Pets 2100 60 By: Kking927

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By: Kking927